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Dunlop has some of the best motorcycle tires that you can count on for superior wear resistance. Within this collection of high quality tires, we would like to draw your attention to the custom designed Elite 3 Radial Touring Tire with its H speed rating. If you want a street sports tire, check out Dunlop Cruiser Bias Tire, with bias-ply construction for excellent grip and mileage.

Some people think that they need a dedicated track bike to do a track day. But, this simply isn’t true as long as you have a motorcycle that has a reasonable amount of cornering clearance. This includes most standard, sport, sport touring, adventure, and even touring machines. Cruiser motorcycles are probably the only machines that are not really appropriate for fast cornering and spirited riding.
The Power Ones were a very popular tyre in its old form with many track riders and racers swearing by them. The tyre was also used as a control tyre in some club races which further cemented it’s ability. Michelin have brought in the Cup tyres to replace the One, so I have no doubt they will be just as good and highly likely much better. Here’s a look at the three compounds:
Not precious- Many new track day riders suffer undue stress over the anxiety of crashing their beautiful, high-dollar, chrome and carbon laden street bike. Thankfully, it’s easy not to crash at a track day if you ride within your ability. So, if all you have is your pride and joy, go ahead and bring it to the track, but at some point when you start pushing harder, you may want a dedicated track bike that has less sentimental value.
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So what you’ll find here are a selection of tyres that are designed for those riders that are more inclined to just have the odd spirited ride on dry roads (fair weather riders, as we’re known), but tyres which will also supply you with more than enough grip to hoon around on track too. And while they will work in the wet to a degree, that’s not what their principal aim.
Im an owner of a 98 Ninja ZX6R and a 03 GSXR 1000. Ive been riding for about 10 years and have always dreamed of racing and one day going to the Isle of Man TT races(where anyone can enter to race). So I am looking into getting into some track days and while its not what I had in mind, it will have to do because racing on the street is just stupid, even though Im guilty of that too. LoL anyways. thanks for the various articles, I enjoyed them very much. I also thought it might be worth mentioning somewhere in this article on the best track day bikes… Sometimes its more fun to have a smaller bike, like the saying goes, “Its funner to ride a slow bike fast than it is to ride a fast bike slow”. I believe that can have truth in it. Though dont get me wrong. My 1000 is my #1.

Inexpensive- You don’t need a $10,000 machine to have a great time at a track day. As a matter of fact, if you spend all your money on your bike, then you will not have as much money available for track day registration fees and top-notch riding gear. Another criteria that makes track riding a whole lot less expensive is if you have a bike that is easy on tires. Also, forgo unnecessary bling and wait until you have at least a few track days under your belt before you make any performance modifications. Suspension and brake mods are acceptable at any time, though.
The performance of a tire depends on several things. First, there are different types of motorcycle tires made for different riders and bikes. This means that a tire will deliver what it’s meant for. For example, sport tires deliver an unmatched grip on diverse surfaces, but at the expense of the tread. If you’re looking for tires with the highest mileage, the best choice would be touring tires. On the other hand, if you’re looking for a compromise, the best option will be sport touring. First, identify where you will be riding; if it’s a commuting bike, go for tires with improved mileage and that performs well on diverse surfaces.
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According to verified independent testers, Michelin Commander II Rear Cruiser Tire last twice as long when compared to other competing cruiser tires. With this in mind, it’s no wonder that the best way to describe Commander II tires is exceptional durability. In case you are looking for sports touring tires, check the Michelin Road 3 for performance that lasts.


The four different types of motorcycle tire styles perform differently on different surfaces. The best style depends on your riding style and the bike. Cruiser or touring wheels have a high mileage, which is why they’re made from hard rubber compounds. They’re not the best for high speeds, however, and are rather poor when riding on a road or path with numerous corners.
Despite all the differences, the average price of a motorcycle tire is between $100 and $300. While there are some cheap motorcycle tires that can cost as low as $25, they’re not the best. In this review, we didn’t include them. Instead, we picked models that we believe are built to last and ones that won’t compromise your safety. On the upper end, there are tires costing up to $1500 that you can check out if you’re really serious about your ride!

To mark the beginning of a new riding experience, it’s also the best time to invest in other riding gears to enhance your safety. A motorcycle helmet, for instance, is not only essential for your safety while riding, wearing one is also required by law when you’re on your bike. A riding jacket is likewise a key element in your style as well as your safety, as it can help reduce the effects of falling off your bike, especially if you find yourself sliding on the pavement.
The performance of a tire depends on several things. First, there are different types of motorcycle tires made for different riders and bikes. This means that a tire will deliver what it’s meant for. For example, sport tires deliver an unmatched grip on diverse surfaces, but at the expense of the tread. If you’re looking for tires with the highest mileage, the best choice would be touring tires. On the other hand, if you’re looking for a compromise, the best option will be sport touring. First, identify where you will be riding; if it’s a commuting bike, go for tires with improved mileage and that performs well on diverse surfaces.
Thankfully, you’re free to upgrade your tires at will which is what we suggest that you do as soon as you wear them out. The tire you choose to fit will be entirely up to you but clearly some perform better than others. As with most things in life, it’s a compromise between affordability and performance as well as taking into account exactly what you use your bike for.
Consider yourselves informed! Tires are updated every three years or so but the tires reviewed here currently represent the pinnacle of motoring. If you can’t afford the more expensive tires on test, go for one of the budget options. Whatever you do, stay away from lesser known manufacturers who really don’t have anything to offer. Continental, Michelin, Metzeler, Dunlop and even Yokohama should be at the top of your list.

Take it from the experts, who’ve had the chance to try out all the latest rubber on a variety of bikes—there is no single best set of tires for any one motorcycle, only the best riding tires for YOUR motorcycle and how YOU use it. Have a sportbike that you use more for sport touring rather than the track? You’re going to want to look into the top-rated dual compound tires for the longest lasting reliability and best cornering performance. Ride a cruiser you use for commuting AND for long trips? You’ll need an all weather tire that performs in any conditions, and touts high mileage durability for consistent handling, mile after mile.
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